[Top Ten Tuesday] – #1 – Top Ten Books I Read in 2013

Top Ten Tuesday is an original weekly meme created by The Broke and the Bookish. I thought this would be a fun way to share a condensed version of potential rambles and thoughts that I have.

This week’s theme:
Top Ten Books I Read in 2013

Continue reading [Top Ten Tuesday] – #1 – Top Ten Books I Read in 2013

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[Review] Sunset Rising – S.M. McEachern

Book Title:                      Sunset Rising (Sunset Rising Series #01)
Author:                            
S.M. McEachern
Number of pages:      325

Synopsis:

s.m. mceachern - sunset rising (cover)

February 2024: Desperate to find refuge from the nuclear storm, a group of civilians discover a secret government bio-dome. Greeted by a hail of bullets and told to turn back, the frantic refugees stand their ground and are grudgingly permitted entry. But the price of admission is high.

283 years later… Sunny O’Donnell is a seventeen-year-old slave who has never seen the sun. She was born in the Pit, a subterranean extension of the bio-dome. Though life had never been easy, lately it had become a nightmare. Her mom was killed in the annual Cull, and her dad thought it was a good time to give up on life. Reyes Crowe, her long-time boyfriend, was pressuring her to get married, even though it would mean abandoning her father.

She didn’t think things could get any worse until she was forced upstairs to the Dome to be a servant-girl at a bachelor party. That’s where she met Leisel Holt, the president’s daughter, and her fiancé, Jack Kenner.

Now Sunny is wanted for treason. If they catch her, she’ll be executed.

She thought Leisel’s betrayal was the end. But it was just the beginning.

(re: Goodreads @ Sunset Rising by S.M. McEachern)

Should this book be picked up? the tl;dr spoiler-less review:
  • A fast-paced action filled read based on tyranny versus revolution.
  • Strong heroine/protagonist and charming/witty male lead; prototypical YA romance.
  • Typical, mundane tasks made interesting and given life.
  • Interesting world building that’s seemingly larger than what it seems.
Initial Thoughts:

I finished this in about a half day so I guess you could say I couldn’t put this book down. It wasn’t a mind blowing or intensely thought provoking experience, and to be honest, I wasn’t expecting that. I was looking for an action driven dystopian narrative with a respectable plot and I think I got just that.

And like many books within this particular subgenre, it really is best to go in with an open mind and not make comparisons to its existing predecessors. But if you’re one to judge like that then consider this: if you’re to take elements from currently trending YA dystopian series (I won’t name them, but you can take a guess) and they all created a love child then this would be one of their offspring. But hey, remember a lot of formula goes into writing narratives within this subgenre as well so it’s not all too surprising.

The cover is nice and the synopsis does enough to bring you into the book. I’ll tangent further into this in the review itself.

Disclaimer: Potential spoilers inherent to this review from here onward.

Continue reading [Review] Sunset Rising – S.M. McEachern

[Review] Barracuda – Christos Tsiolkas

Book Title:                         Barracuda (Standalone)
Author:
                               Christos Tsiolkas
Number of pages:         528

Synopsis:christos tsiolkas - barracuda (cover)

“He asked the water to lift him, to carry him, to avenge him. He made his muscles shape his fury, made every stroke declare his hate. And the water obeyed; the water would give him his revenge. No one could beat him, no one came close.”

His whole life Danny Kelly’s only wanted one thing: to win Olympic gold. Everything he’s ever done – every thought, every dream, every action – takes him closer to that moment of glory, of vindication, when the world will see him for what he is: the fastest, the strongest and the best. His life has been a preparation for that moment.

His parents struggle to send him to the most prestigious private school with the finest swimming program; Danny loathes it there and is bullied and shunned as an outsider, but his coach is the best and knows Danny is, too, better than all those rich boys, those pretenders. Danny’s win-at-all-cost ferocity gradually wins favour with the coolest boys – he’s Barracuda, he’s the psycho, he’s everything they want to be but don’t have the guts to get there. He’s going to show them all.

“He would be first, everything would be alright when he came first, all would be put back in place. When he thought of being the best, only then did he feel calm.”

(an excerpt re: Goodreads @ Barracuda by Christos Tsiolkas)

Should this book be picked up? the tl;dr spoiler-less review:
  • A coming of age story with converging perspectives to recount the then and now of Daniel Kelly’s life.
  • Prose is expertly versed, imaginative and evocative, even if long-winded.
  • Characters are brutally honest, real, and provoke both negative/positive emotions.
  • The plotting is seemingly basic but manages to capture a variety of genres.
Initial Thoughts:

I am perplexed.

But what I am sure of is that I’m a bit disappointed that the book cover (and its title by proxy) could have made me believe that this kid had some pseudo-merman powers or the like. Seriously.

However, the synopsis is certainly poignant. And if the blurb is of indication of the writing in this book then you’re certainly a winner for picking this book up because everything is meticulously described. To expand upon this point: you just didn’t somehow load up this blog (although that is cool beans as well)—no, that would be too easy… through the reflection of the backlit screen your eyes graze a query into the deepest desires for knowledge. A white manifestation of your soul skeptically hovers, looming, unsure, and you begin to wonder what the heck I’m talking about now…) Yeah, that’s my take on how overbearing and fluffy some descriptions tended to be. But I guess there’s substance in that so I can’t complain that much.

I will admit: I don’t usually gravitate towards novels fixated on a cultural-contemporary nature. Actually, I don’t remember how I came across Barracuda in the first place. But with Sochi (and Olympic feels) rapidly approaching, I felt this to be a great fit to explore the battle of an athlete’s mentality; and all of the inherent struggles and fix-ins that came with it.

Let’s dive right in.

Disclaimer: Potential spoilers inherent to this review have been minimized with exceptions to quotes.

 

Continue reading [Review] Barracuda – Christos Tsiolkas

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